Market Data April 18, 2022

Quarter One 2022 Residential Report for Santa Clara County

Quarter One 2022 Residential Report
Residential Real Estate in Santa Clara County

Download a complimentary copy of this report: Q1 2022 Residential Report for Santa Clara County


Reports for a specific zip code or city are available now. Send me an email at JKlotz@intero.com or call/text 408-504-2484 to request your complimentary copy.


In this report I compare first quarter year-over-year statistics and year-to-date results for residential real estate in Santa Clara County. This report covers a broad area and your city data will vary from these statistics. Send me a request for your localized report based on city or zip code.
→ Monthly City Reports Available: https://www.klotzhomes.com/silicon-valley-market-stats


Q1 2022 vs. Q1 2021 (Single-Family Homes)

Number of homes for sale on the market…

For the first quarter of 2022 in Santa Clara County, the number of new listings on the market is down by ↓ 7.97% compared to the first quarter of 2021.


Number of homes sold from the market…

In the first quarter 2022, the number of home sales is down by ↓ 14.7% in Santa Clara County versus the previous year.


Average days a home is listed on the market before a seller accepts an offer…

The average days on market is down by ↓ 23% in 2022 within Santa Clara County compared to the first quarter of 2021.


Q1 2022 vs. Q1 2021 (Single-Family & Condo)

Single-Family: Median sales price for Q1 2022 is $1,850,000 an increase of ↑ 23.33% compared to Q1 2021

Condo/Townhome: Median Sales prices for Q1 2022 is $960,000 an increase of ↑ 12.81% compared to Q1 2021

Avg sale price in Santa Clara County Q1 2022

Single-Family: Average sales price for Q1 2022 is $2,194,814 an increase of ↑ 21.52% compared to Q1 2021

Condo/Townhome: Average sales price for Q1 2022 is $1,051,793 an increase of  ↑ 12.62% compared to Q1 2021


Single-Family Home (Q1 2022) Condo/Townhome (Q1 2022)

 → Q1 2022 Statistics for Single-Family Homes 

 → Q1 2022 Statistics for Condos/Townhomes


In conclusion,

Home inventory remains low in the first quarter of 2022, while homes are selling faster and for more money compared to the previous year. Less inventory means higher demand. While interest rates are rising, home buyers are feeling pressure to purchase a home now. Many home buyers are now looking to off-market listings so they do not have to compete with other buyers. Looking for off-market opportunities? Contact me at 408-504-2484


Sellers. My team and I net you more money for the sale of your home. Reach out for your complimentary consultation.

Buyers. Don’t let this competitive market bring you down. Proper representation is key to your success as a home buyer in this market. I stay current with the marketplace, keep my clients informed and assist them before, during and after they purchase their new home. Reach out to me to discover the difference I can make for you in this competitive real estate market.

Investors. I am current with off-market opportunities around Santa Clara County and San Mateo County. I’m happy to present these opportunities to my investor clients. Reach out to me for me information.

Jonathan Klotz, Realtor®
DRE# 01951800  | 
408-504-2484  |  jklotz@intero.com
YouTube  |  LinkedIn  |  Facebook

Market Data March 9, 2022

Real Estate Voted Best Long-Term Investment

Real Estate Voted as Better Investment Than Stocks, Gold and Savings for 8th Consecutive Year

Nationally, real estate tops the list as the best long-term investment for the eighth year straight. (Source: Gallup) Real estate continues to gain traction as the best long-term investment in the country, check out the graph below.

Real Estate Best Investment Nationally

If you’re thinking about purchasing a home this year, this poll should reassure you. Even when inflation is rising like it is today, combined with rising mortgage rates, real estate sales prices continue to climb. Homeowner’s are building incredible amounts of equity as home prices appreciate.

Why Is Real Estate a Great Investment During Times of High Inflation?

With inflation reaching its highest level in 40 years, it’s more important than ever to understand the financial benefits of homeownership. Rising inflation means prices are increasing across the board. That includes goods, services, housing costs, and more. But when you purchase your home, you lock in your monthly housing payments, effectively shielding yourself from increasing housing payments. James Royal, Senior Wealth Management Reporter at Bankrate, explains it like this:

“A fixed-rate mortgage allows you to maintain the biggest portion of housing expenses at the same payment. Sure, property taxes will rise and other expenses may creep up, but your monthly housing payment remains the same.” 

James Royal, Senior Wealth Management Reporter at Bankrate (Source)

If you’re a renter, you don’t have that same benefit. You aren’t protected from increases in your housing costs, especially rising rents.

History Shows During Inflationary Periods, Home Prices Rise

As a homeowner, your house is an asset that typically increases in value over time, even during inflation. That‘s because, as prices rise, the value of your home does, too. And that makes buying a home a great hedge during periods of high inflation.

“Tangible assets like real estate get more valuable over time, which makes buying a home a good way to spend your money during inflationary times.”

Natalie Campisi, Advisor Staff for Forbes (Source)

In conclusion, housing truly is a strong investment, especially when inflation is high. When you lock in a mortgage payment, you’re shielded from housing cost increases, and you own an asset that typically gains value with time. If you want to better understand how buying a home could be a great investment for you, let’s connect today.

Jonathan Klotz, Realtor | (408)504-2484 | jklotz@intero.com | YouTube | LinkedIn | Facebook

Real Estate Tips January 10, 2022

7 Tips for First-Time Home Buyers

7 Tips for First-Time Home Buyers

Buying real estate for the first time can feel quite intimidating – you’ve got to deal with agents, sellers, rival buyers, banks and lawyers. And it’s not always clear what role each of them plays in the process. 

As an experienced local agent, I have worked with many young and first-time buyers. It’s great to guide them on the journey of property ownership and help set them on the path to building their wealth through real estate.

Any first-home buyer should appreciate that they always have access to many professionals who can help explain the various tasks and processes required to buy a home. It’s not like you’ll walk through the experience blindfolded.

To help you on your way, here’s a quick list of tips for the first-time buyer. You’ll find the act of buying property is not as intimidating as you might have feared.

  1. Start saving:  That means not only reducing your day-to-day spending but also working to reduce regular payments on debts for items such as a car or personal loan. These obligations will reduce the amount of money a lender will allow you to borrow.
  2. Work out a budget: Investigate how much you might be able to borrow. Factor in the expenses of buying a home, such as legal costs and moving. You should then have an idea of what you can afford. Setting your expectations early on will focus your home-hunting efforts and avoid disappointment.  
  3. Arrange financing: Spend time exploring your options. Some banks demand a 20% deposit; others are more flexible. Perhaps your parents will go guarantor for the loan, or part of it. Consider using a mortgage broker as they will guide you and recommend suitable loan options. 
  4. Pre-approval is the first-step: Getting a letter of pre-approval from a lender is the first-step in the home-buying process so you know what you can afford. A lender won’t give you a pile of cash based on your salary. They’ll grant “pre-approval”, which means you can make a monetary commitment with confidence. However, the lender will finalize its approval once they’ve valued and approved the property you intend to buy. 
  5. Get mentally prepared – With your finances lined up, you need to think about the dynamics of buying a home. If you find your dream place, you better believe others will love it, too. So, be prepared to move quickly to beat the competition.
  6. Find a great agent – For a first-time buyer, a great agent will make the experience smoother and less stressful. When selecting an agent, ask each one to share with you properties they’ve bought for other clients. This will indicate whether they can find what you’re seeking.
  7. Go hunting – House hunting is fun but exhausting. In a hot market, it can get stressful because of buyer competition. Don’t be put off, and keep your focus. You may miss out on a few properties, but there are more out there.
California DRE December 2, 2021

New Real Estate Laws in California 2022

Summary of New Real Estate Laws in California for 2022

Below are summaries of new state laws that affect real estate licensees and applicants. Unless otherwise noted, the laws take effect January 1, 2022

·  Assembly Bill (AB) 107 requires that the Department of Real Estate collect information about military, veteran, and spouse license applications, including the number of expedited license applications, the number of expedited licenses issued and denied per calendar year, and the average length of time between application and expedited license issuance.  DRE will submit an annual report to the Legislature.

·  AB 502 allows homeowners associations (HOAs), regardless of size, to elect by acclamation candidates for the board of directors, if the number of candidates is no greater than the number of vacancies. To do so, the HOA will have to meet increased noticing provisions, have had a regular election in the past three years, confirmed receipt of a candidate nomination, and provided a disqualified nominee the opportunity to appeal. The HOA board must also consider the vote by acclamation at a meeting where the agenda includes the name of each candidate to be elected in that manner.

·  AB 830 allows real estate licensees who change their legal surname from the name under which the license was originally issued to continue to use their former surname for business purposes. The bill also provides that the former last name does not constitute a fictitious name prohibited under real estate law. The licensee must file both the new and previous name with DRE. 

·  Beginning July 1, 2022, AB 838 requires that a city or county inspect a property if it receives a complaint about lead hazards or substandard living conditions.  Upon inspection, it will have to advise the property owner of violations and required remedies, and then re-inspect the property.  Among other provisions, AB 838 provides that an inspection not be conditioned on a tenant being current on rent or other factors. Inspection fees cannot be charged, unless substandard conditions or lead hazards are found.

·  AB 948 creates the Fair Appraisal Act. Among its provisions, every sales contract for real property made after July 1, 2022, must include a notice stating that the property appraisal of the property must be unbiased, objective, and not influenced by specific factors, including: race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, marital status, medical condition, military or veteran status, national origin, source of income, ancestry, disability, genetic information, or age. The notice will also include information on actions a buyer or seller can take if they believe an appraisal has been affected.

·  AB 1101 modifies current financial practices and insurance requirements for homeowners associations (HOAs) in common interest developments. The bill prevents managing agents from investing HOA funds in stocks or high-risk investments, and removes the ability to co-mingle funds, among other provisions. The bill also requires HOAs and their managing agents to maintain crime insurance, employee dishonesty insurance, and fidelity bond coverage, or their equivalents.

·  AB 1466 changes the Restrictive Covenant Modification process. Among these changes are increasing the types of people and entities that can request a modification, expanding current notices to include information on how to request a modification, and requiring that professionals involved in property sales inform buyers and sellers about

an existing restrictive covenant and increasing their duty to assist in filing a modification. In addition, the bill creates a new $2 fee on real estate instruments subject to the SB 2 (Atkins, Chapter 364, Statutes of 2017) recording fee to fund redaction work.

·  Beginning January 1, 2023, Senate Bill (SB) 263 modifies the content of two courses required to take either the real estate salesperson or broker licensing exam. The real estate practice course will include a component on implicit bias and the legal aspects of real estate course will include a component on federal and state fair housing.

Also beginning January 1, 2023, the required continuing education course for salespersons and brokers on fair housing will include an interactive participatory component and a new two-hour implicit bias continuing education course will be required.

·  SB 800 extends the sunset date for both the Department of Real Estate and the Bureau of Real Estate Appraisers to January 1, 2026. The measure also allows the Department of Real Estate to use debarment notices issued by sister agencies as grounds for action, codifies the current policy of expediting license applications for veterans and partners of members of the Armed Forces, and clarifies the definition of a real estate license in good standing.

Source: DRE (Department of Real Estate) Services

Jonathan Klotz, Realtor | (408)504-2484 | jklotz@intero.com | YouTube | LinkedIn | Facebook